Coronavirus/COVID-19

Most of our services are working as normal, with our staff working from home.

If you need any support please call us on 01606 331 853. For more information and useful links please click here.

Our Office Number: 01606 331 853

Our Office Number: 01606 331 853

About Us

We are Disability Positive. Disability Positive is the new name for Cheshire Centre for Independent Living.

People told us that our old name didn’t make it clear who we were and how we can help.

We have worked with brand experts to create a name and visual identity which shows clearly that we’re an ambitious charity who is working towards a world that is positive about people who live with disability and long-term health conditions.

We are very excited about our new name and how we now look. It’s bright and positive, just like us.

Now we’re Disability Positive, inside and out!

We are a charity based in Cheshire and work mostly in the North West. We love working with others who think like us.

We provide services, opportunities and a voice to people living with disability and long-term health conditions, and their families.

We have services to help people with everyday life, being part of their local community and looking after their own wellbeing, we can offer advice, help with practical tasks and advocate for people in lots of different situations. We listen and share people’s experiences to influence positive change in government policy.

We know it matters, because we live with disability and long-term health conditions too.

The social model of disability

The social model of disability is the starting point for everything we do and is the idea that people are not disabled by their condition, but by a world that doesn’t meet their needs.

For example,

If you are Deaf and use British Sign Language (BSL), you are disabled because there is often no BSL interpreter, not because you are Deaf.

If you use a wheelchair, you are disabled because there is often no step free access to buildings, not because you use a wheelchair.

If you are autistic and find the bright lights in meeting rooms difficult, you are disabled because the meeting host has not adjusted the lighting, not because you are autistic. 

If you have a bowel condition  which means you need an accessible toilet, you are disabled by the attitudes of people who make you feel that you shouldn’t be using an accessible toilet, not by your bowel condition.

If you are visually impaired, you are disabled by not being given information in audio or large print, not by your visual impairment.

If you have anxiety and depression and find travelling at rush hour more difficult, you are disabled by your employer not making reasonable adjustments to allow for flexible working, not by your mental health.

We are positive we can help create a world where everybody has equal access to education, work and life in a way that meets their needs.

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